How many 40 year olds are single in the UK?

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How many 40 year olds are single in the UK? looking forward to your oppinion

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  1. According to figures released by the Office for National Statistics, there were 1.3 million unmarried adults aged 40–49 living in England and Wales in 2015. That figure represents 19% of the population of that age group.

    It is estimated that about half of them had never married.

    There were also 2.1 million unmarried adults aged 50–59 living in England and Wales at the time. That number represented 20% of the population of the age group.

    A further 3.5 million people aged 60–69 lived in England and Wales in 2016. They accounted for 21% of the population of this age group.

    This compares with 5.8 million unmarried adults aged 70–79 and 4.4 million unmarried adults aged 80 and older. These groups accounted for 26% and 32%, respectively, of the population of the corresponding age groups.

    For every 100 unmarried adults aged 40–59, there were 66 unmarried adults aged 60–69; 58 unmarried adults aged 70–80; and 54 unmarried adults aged 80 and over.

    The average age of first marriage for men has been rising since the 1970s, while it’s fallen slightly for women.

    According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the number of marriages involving a man aged 40 years or older rose from 5% in 1971 to 18% in 2011. The number of marriages involving a woman aged 40 years or older fell from 12% in 1971 to 9% in 2011.

    This trend was most pronounced among women aged 45–49 years, where the proportion of married women dropped from 26% in 1971 to 17% in 2011. However, the overall proportion of women who were married remained stable at around 70%.

    Meanwhile, the ONS reports that the average age of first marriage has risen steadily over the last four decades. In 1971, the average age of first marriages for men was 29 years; this had risen to 32 years by 2001. For women, the corresponding figures were 25 and 27 years respectively.

    By 2011, the average age of men marrying for the first time had reached 38 years, while the average age of women marrying for the first time stood at 31 years. This means that the gap between the ages of men and women when they marry for the first time has widened considerably over the past 50 years.

    The rise in the average age of first matrimony for men is largely due to the fact that there are now fewer younger men available to marry. In 1971, only 1% of men aged 20–24 years were unmarried; by 2011, this figure had risen to 7%. Meanwhile, the percentage of men aged 35–39 years who were unmarried peaked at 13%, but has since declined to 8%.

    The decline in the proportion of young men being unmarried may be partly explained by the fact that men are increasingly delaying marriage until later in life. In 1971, just 2% of men aged 30–34 years were unmarried; by 2010, this figure had risen sharply to 16%.

    The fall in the proportion of women who are unmarried is mainly attributable to the increasing availability of jobs for women outside the home. In 1971, just 4% of women aged 20–24 years worked full-time outside the home; by 2011, this had risen to 21%.

    However, the proportion of women working full-time outside the household has not kept pace with the growth in employment opportunities for women. In 1971, just 6% of women aged 25–29 years worked full-time out of the home; by 2011 this had risen to 14%.

    While the proportion of women working outside the home has grown substantially, the proportion of women still employed inside the home has decreased. In 1971, 43% of women aged 20 years or older worked within the home; by 2011 the proportion had fallen to 34%.

    The proportion of women working outside of the home has also increased significantly among those aged 30–34 years. In 1971, just 10% of women in this age group worked outside the home; by 2006, this figure had risen dramatically to 23%.

    The proportion of men who work outside the home has also increased over the same period. In 1971, just 15% of men aged 20 years or older were employed; by 2011, this proportion had risen to 24%.

    In 2016, the average age of first marriage was 29.5 years for men and 26.9 years for women.

    According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), there were 1,068,000 marriages in England and Wales in 2015. Of these, 895,000 were between two adults aged over 16 years, and 173,000 were between two people who were either married or living together. The remaining couples had not yet reached this stage in their relationship.

    Of those who got married in 2015, the ONS found that the average age at which men and women tied the knot was 29.5 years and 26.9 years respectively. This means that the average person getting married today is now 29.5 years old.

    This figure represents a slight decrease since 2014 when the average age of first wedding was 30.1 years for men and 27.3 years for women. However, the number of weddings involving older brides and grooms has been increasing steadily over recent years.

    In fact, the proportion of marriages involving older brides and groom rose from 5% in 2004 to 11% in 2013. This trend is expected to continue, with the percentage of older brides and groomes set to rise to 20% by 2020.

    There are several reasons why younger people are marrying later than ever before. One reason is that young people are delaying having children until later in life. Another reason is that young people simply aren’t finding suitable partners.

    Another factor contributing to the rising number of older brides and groom is the growing numbers of divorcees remarrying. According to the ONS, the number of divorces recorded in England and Wales rose from 489,000 in 2005 to 627,000 in 2012. This means that approximately 10% of divorced people remarried within five years of their split.

    While the majority of these second marriages involved people who had previously been married, some were between unmarried individuals. These included people who had never been married, cohabiting couples, and same sex couples.

    When looking at the figures above, it’s important to remember that the total number of marriages in England and Wales may be slightly lower than the actual number of marriages because some people marry abroad.

    If you’re interested in learning more about the factors behind the rising number of older bride and groom, take a look at our guide to understanding the causes of divorce.